Arginine, Tongkat Ali, Burned Alive

ISIS Claims Massacre Beheading of Ethiopian Christians in Libya

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Most Asian communities have used Tongkat Ali for centuries to improve their energy levels, improve sex drive , and ramp up the body’s testosterone levels.

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Montgomery, Alabama: Cleaning up scams on the tongkat ali market

Amanda J. Tyler 4534 Willow Greene Drive Montgomery, AL 36109

Most of the tongkat ali sold via the Internet is fake. [1] [2] I assume that about 97 percent of the sites selling tongkat ali cheat customers. Worst infected are trade portals like Amazon, eBay, and Alibaba. Anybody can start selling on Amazon, eBay, and Alibaba. One just has to offer a fake product at a price which is low enough, and will have the first stupid buyer within three days. Payments can be accepted without necessity to reveal one’s identity. And that is the crux.

Many people with low moral standards are willing to become fraudsters if they can hide their identities. And the best buyer protection is to demand to pay to a personal bank account. Avoid PayPal and even credit cards when paying for tongkat ali.

After you paid to a bank account, and if you doubt your supplier is legitimate, let me know.

References:

1
Mazlina Mohd Said, Rapid detection of sildenafil analogue in Eurycoma longifolia products using a new two-tier procedure of the near infrared (NIR) spectra database Food Chemistry
Volume 158, 1 September 2014, Pages 296–301

2
Junhua Zhang, Quality of herbal medicines: Challenges and solutions, Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Volume 20, Issues 1–2, February–April 2012, Pages 100–106

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Bennington, Vermont: World’s heaviest man goes under knife in Mexico

Henry G. Pruitt 963 Duff Avenue Bennington, VT 05201

Juan Pedro Franco at one point weighed almost 600 kilogrammes. The surgery intended to reduce his weight by half was “quite successful”.

The world’s heaviest man, who at one point weighed almost 600 kilogrammes, has undergone successful gastric bypass surgery, his doctors in Mexico said.

The procedure on Juan Pedro Franco is intended to reduce his weight by half, and is expected to be followed up with another operation, his surgeon Jose Castaneda said Tuesday.

“The surgery was quite successful. But now we have to wait and see how he responds to the (systemic) change. Let’s hope everything goes well,” Castaneda said.

The procedure has left the patient “quite delicate”, and he is being closely monitored, Castaneda said.

Franco, who at his peak tipped the scales at 595 kilogrammes, was told that in order to be eligible for surgery, he had to lose a large amount of his initial bulk. He also had to get his diabetes and blood pressure under control.

The operation was given the green light when doctors said they were pleased with his steady progress and motivation, which marked a change for Franco, who had spent years in bed.

When the second procedure is done, likely in November, Franco’s stomach size will be reduced and his intestines modified.

Most importantly, the patient has to progress on the psychological and nutritional fronts. “If that does not happen, the entire thing will fail,” Castaneda warned.

Mexico’s Manuel Uribe, who in 2007 held the record for being the world’s heaviest man at 597 kilogrammes, died last year.

Egyptian Eman Ahmed Abd El Aty, who was believed to be the world’s heaviest woman, recently underwent gastric bypass surgery in India.

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Saint Louis, Missouri: Vaginoplasty | Vaginal Tightening | Costhetics

Brian L. Traylor 254 Blane Street Saint Louis, MO 63130

Childbirth can stretch the vagina and the birth canal, reducing both tone and strength. An overstretched or wide vagina and the resulting smoothening of the area can reduce friction and pleasurable sensation during sex for both partners. It can cause intercourse to be painful and in some cases leads to urinary incontinence and even bowel movement issues.

Vaginal stretching can also lead to difficulty keeping tampons in place and may produce gas-like noises during intercourse.

Exercises—sometimes referred to as perineal and sphincter re-education—can help restore lost muscle tone while strengthening the pelvic floor. Kegel exercises are also helpful. The benefits of exercise can be limited, however, especially for women who have had multiple children.

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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Jonesboro, Arkansas: Public sex acts alleged in charges against Arkansas man and woman

Formal charges have been filed against an Arkansas man and woman who produced videos of sexual acts in public places in Jonesboro, authorities said Monday.

Full story

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Anaheim, California: Anesthesia Awareness: Breaking Down the Barriers to Prevention

Antonio P. Garcia 3338 Maple Street Anaheim, CA 92801

Opinions surrounding intraoperative awareness may vary, but one thing is certain, even a single case is one too many.

The clinical definition of intraoperative awareness — consciousness during general anesthesia — is a seemingly simple explanation for a complex, and controversial, phenomenon. Opinions surrounding how often intraoperative awareness, also described as anesthesia awareness, occurs, its implications for victims, as well as the best methods for prevention are varied.

But for Carol Weihrer, the issue is crystal clear. Weihrer, who claims she was conscious during a 1998 surgical procedure to remove her right eye, believes that anesthesia awareness is more widespread and debilitating than people realize. And she has the proof, she says, to back-up her claim.

“I have spoken to thousands of people with experiences similar to mine,” said Weihrer. “People like me, whose lives have been turned upside down because of it.”

As founder of the international Anesthesia Awareness Campaign, Weihrer’s goal is to educate the public about the phenomenon and to be a touchstone for other victims.

Weihrer is also lobbying for the mandated use of brain function monitors for patients undergoing general anesthesia. She believes that until these monitors become a standard of care, patients must be proactive in protecting themselves in the OR. “It’s not enough to ask whether a facility has brain function monitors or whether they use them. You must demand that they use them on you during your surgery,” she explained.

Tracking brain waves When used in the OR, brain function monitors reportedly measure a patient’s depth of anesthesia and level of consciousness. One of the most popular tools for this purpose is bispectral index (BIS) technology.

Aspect Medical’s BIS monitor involves measuring the brain’s electrical activity through a sensor placed on the patient’s forehead. The BIS value ranges from 100 (indicating an awake patient) to zero (indicating the absence of brain activity). This information is used to guide administration of anesthetic medication. Aspect’s BIS technology is available as a stand-alone monitor or as a module that can be incorporated into other manufacturers’ monitoring systems.

Irene Osborn, M.D., associate professor of Anesthesiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, and director, Division of Neuroanesthesia, began using BIS technology in 1996 while at NYU Medical Center and currently uses it in about 80 percent of the surgeries she performs. She says it has definitely made an impact on her ability to care for patients.

“The ability to monitor the brain really helps you improve anesthetic care,” said Dr. Osborn. “There is variability in patients’ response to anesthesia — not everyone requires the same dose or concentration,” she continued. “With BIS, I can separate out the different components of anesthesia and determine how much anesthetic is needed for a particular patient.”

Dr. Osborn uses BIS technology to improve the quality of anesthesia and also to monitor for awareness. Often times Versed is administered just prior to surgery to produce amnesia. With the BIS monitor, Dr. Osborn says she can see the effects of the Versed dose and increase it if necessary.

“In the OR there is a lot of monitoring going on — heart rate, blood pressure and various body systems. With BIS, I can also monitor the brain,” Dr. Osborn said.

Not ready for prime time? The American Society of Anesthesiology’s (ASA) “Practice Advisory for Intraoperative Awareness and Brain Function Monitoring” makes several recommendations to assist decision-making for patient care with the goal of reducing awareness, but stops short of mandating the use of brain function monitors for this purpose. Instead, the ASA advises anesthesiologists to use their own discretion when it comes to using the monitors.

Although she personally chooses to use brain function monitoring, Dr. Osborn understands why many of her colleagues have yet to embrace it.

“Brain function monitoring technology is not yet good enough, it’s not real time,” explained Dr. Osborn. “What you see on the monitor reflects something that happened 15 seconds ago.”

Others may simply not want to take the time to understand the monitors. If, for example, there was no muscle relaxant administered to the patient, there may be EMG artifact on the monitor and anesthesiologists must be familiar in working around that, says Dr. Osborn. The monitor will not predict movement, rather, it tells how asleep the patient is.

At Mount Sinai, Dr. Osborn estimates that one-third of the physicians use the technology quite frequently, one-third use it for special cases and one-third refuse to use it at all. She does believe, however, that brain function monitors will become standard operating procedure in all hospitals in about 10 years.

“As the technology matures and as we train another generation of anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists on how to use it, more will want it and the timing will be right for it to become a standard of care,” Dr. Osborn said.

Determined that this is the case — sooner rather than later — Weihrer has taken her Anesthesia Awareness Campaign on the road, speaking both nationally and internationally to physician groups and other organizations. She has performed Grand Rounds, speaking to anesthesia staff at several East Coast hospitals about her own and others’ experiences. She has worked with The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), American Association of periOperative Nurses (AORN) and the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA), and says she is currently collaborating with the ASA on an anesthesia awareness victims database. MedicAlert bracelets are available through the campaign for patients who have suffered awareness in the past or have a familial disposition to anesthesia awareness.

“The Anesthesia Awareness Campaign is definitely gaining momentum,” Weihrer said. “The public is becoming more involved and demanding assurances.”

Weihrer says she will continue to advocate for change in the OR until her efforts are no longer needed — until brain function monitors are used on every general anesthesia patient and there are no more anesthesia awareness victims.

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The world is full of multimillionaires who can't handle money. Because, if you have money, if you don't ditch your Western wife, you will never have a harem.

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Glendale, California: Richard Dawkins on vivisection: "But can they suffer?"

Brett R. Reyna 670 New York Avenue Glendale, CA 91204

The great moral philosopher Jeremy Bentham, founder of utilitarianism, famously said,'The question is not, "Can they reason?" nor, "Can they talk?" but rather, "Can they suffer?" Most people get the point, but they treat human pain as especially worrying because they vaguely think it sort of obvious that a species' ability to suffer must be positively correlated with its intellectual capacity. Plants cannot think, and you'd have to be pretty eccentric to believe they can suffer. Plausibly the same might be true of earthworms. But what about cows?

What about dogs? I find it almost impossible to believe that René Descartes, not known as a monster, carried his philosophical belief that only humans have minds to such a confident extreme that he would blithely spreadeagle a live mammal on a board and dissect it. You'd think that, in spite of his philosophical reasoning, he might have given the animal the benefit of the doubt. But he stood in a long tradition of vivisectionists including Galen and Vesalius, and he was followed by William Harvey and many others (See from which this picture is taken).

How could they bear to do it: tie a struggling, screaming mammal down with ropes and dissect its living heart, for example? Presumably they believed what came to be articulated by Descartes: that non-human animals have no soul and feel no pain.

Most of us nowadays believe that dogs and other non-human mammals can feel pain, and no reputable scientist today would follow Descartes' and Harvey's horrific example and dissect a living mammal without anaesthetic. British law, among others, would severely punish them if they did (although invertebrates are not so well protected, not even large-brained octopuses). Nevertheless, most of us seem to assume, without question, that the capacity to feel pain is positively correlated with mental dexterity - with the ability to reason, think, reflect and so on. My purpose here is to question that assumption. I see no reason at all why there should be a positive correlation. Pain feels primal, like the ability to see colour or hear sounds. It feels like the sort of sensation you don't need intellect to experience. Feelings carry no weight in science but, at the very least, shouldn't we give the animals the benefit of the doubt?

Without going into the interesting literature on Animal Suffering (see, for instance, Marian Stamp Dawkins's excellent book of that title, and her forthcoming Rethinking Animals), I can see a Darwinian reason why there might even be be a negative correlation between intellect and susceptibility to pain. I approach this by asking what, in the Darwinian sense, pain is for. It is a warning not to repeat actions that tend to cause bodily harm. Don't stub your toe again, don't tease a snake or sit on a hornet, don't pick up embers however prettily they glow, be careful not to bite your tongue. Plants have no nervous system capable of learning not to repeat damaging actions, which is why we cut live lettuces without compunction.

It is an interesting question, incidentally, why pain has to be so damned painful. Why not equip the brain with the equivalent of a little red flag, painlessly raised to warn, "Don't do that again"? In The Greatest Show on Earth

I suggested that the brain might be torn between conflicting urges and tempted to 'rebel', perhaps hedonistically, against pursuing the best interests of the individual's genetic fitness, in which case it might need to be whipped agonizingly into line. I'll let that pass and return to my primary question for today: would you expect a positive or a negative correlation between mental ability and ability to feel pain? Most people unthinkingly assume a positive correlation, but why?

Isn't it plausible that a clever species such as our own might need less pain, precisely because we are capable of intelligently working out what is good for us, and what damaging events we should avoid? Isn't it plausible that an unintelligent species might need a massive wallop of pain, to drive home a lesson that we can learn with less powerful inducement?

At very least, I conclude that we have no general reason to think that non-human animals feel pain less acutely than we do, and we should in any case give them the benefit of the doubt. Practices such as branding cattle, castration without anaesthetic, and bullfighting should be treated as morally equivalent to doing the same thing to human beings.

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Eurycomanone is one of several dozens of components of tongkat ali. There are many phony claims about standardization. Chinese chemicals companies sell Eurycomanone as a lab chemical for about 100 USD for 10 milligrams: http://m.phytopurify.com/eurycomanone-p-8083.html?gclid=CJHynuOa1tQCFUqhaAodtAMAlA However, this is lab grade, not intended for human consumption. You are NOT a guinea pig.

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Needham, Massachusetts: EUROPE'S HOLY WAR: Continent to be 'DESTROYED by merciless RELIGIOUS conflict'

Monica W. Redfern 4936 Smith Street Needham, MA 02192

The coming year and beyond will most likely see bloodshed across the continent as a battle between cultures turns violent.

The prediction of an impending religious war has been made by numerous experts, from the Dalai Lama to the western world's most influential think tanks.

Warnings of religious warfare across the secular continent have come as early as 2006 – years before the migration crisis even began.

American think-tank, the Washington Institute, published a shocking report stating a religious war is looming.

It said: "The Crusades began with a rumour of defilement. In 1095, Pope Urban II denounced the Muslims as 'a race utterly alienated from God'.

"This is exactly how Islam's leaders are demonising the West in the 21st."

It came after millions of Muslims took part in angry protests when a Danish publisher printed cartoons of the Islamic prophet Muhammed.

It argued that the at some point "the crusade" will begin, but this time it "would be a Muslim one" as "its advance scouts are already at work in Europe".

Other think tanks, including European and US-based ones, have also discussed growing Muslim populations in Europe in relation to religious intolerance.

But some of the most explosive warnings have come from prominent religious leaders.

Just days ago, a high-profile Italian archbishop warned that his country and the rest of Europe will "soon be Muslim".

Monsignor Carlo Liberati, the Archbishop Emeritus of Pompeii, apocalyptically predicted the mass displacement of Christian heritage Europeans due to declining birth rates and less public engagement with the church.

Speaking to Catholic journal La Fede Quotidiana, he said: "Parishes are the only thing still standing. We need a true Christian life. All this paves the way to Islam. In addition to this, they have children and we do not. We are in full decline.

"In 10 years we will all be Muslims because of our stupidity."

In May, the Dalai Lama – himself a refugee and known for his charitable and humanitarian views – told a German news outlet that there are "too many" refugees in Europe.

The spiritual leader said the continent and Germany "cannot become an Arab country", adding refugees should only be "admitted temporarily".

And a year ago, Moscow's chief Rabbi Pinchas Goldschmidt wrote in the Telegraph that "we must realise that we have now entered a religious war".

Their comments came as Europe was hit by the effects of a migration crisis that is on a scale never seen before.

In 2015 alone, well over a million economic migrants and refugees flooded into the continent from countries such as Syria, Afghanistan, Eritrea and Somalia.

Critics of the open-door policy have repeatedly lashed out at European governments, arguing the scale of the crisis have stoked religious and racial tensions.

Across Europe, right-wing parties – particularly those with unfavourable views of Islam – have seen their popularity grow.

In France, the far-right Front National has seen its support triple in five years.

And in Germany, which bore the brunt of refugee arrivals, polls suggest those intending to vote for the Alternative for Germany (AfD) are at their highest levels ever.

In May 2015, the political party declared in its very own manifesto that "Islam is not part of Germany".

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Freehold, New Jersey: Neurosurgeon plans to bring deceased BACK TO LIFE with pioneering BRAIN TRANSPLANT

John K. Edwards 3025 Passaic Street Freehold, NJ 07728

DEAD people who have been cryogenically frozen could be brought back to life within three years - by having their brains transplanted into in a new body, a pioneering neurosurgeon has claimed.

Professor Sergio Canavero is preparing to perform the world's first successful head transplant this December and believes the first ever brain transplant is only a few years away from also becoming a reality.

Prof Canavero, director of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, said his team had made "massive progress" in experiments that "seemed impossible even as recently as a few months ago".

In an interview with German magazine Ooom, he said: "We are currently planning the world’s first brain transplant, and I consider it realistic that we will be ready in three years at the latest."

Despite the huge scientific and ethical implications of his work, Prof Canavero is pressing ahead with his ground-breaking plans, and has teamed up with Dr. Xiaoping Ren of China to carry out the world's first head transplant later this year.

The operation will be carried out at Harbin Medical University, northern China, and the patient will be Chinese, Prof Canavero said.

The biggest barrier to a successful head transplant is reconnecting the brain to the severed spinal column, in order to control movement and sensation.

But Prof Canavero insisted: "This problem has now been solved."

He said his team had successfully restored mobility to mice that had had their spinal chords entirely severed using a fluid called Texas-PEG.

He added that many controlled studies on different animals had been conducted in South Korea and China and that the results were "unambiguous".

"The spinal cord – and with it the ability to move – can be entirely restored," he said.

Plans to perform the world's first brain transplant are already underway, the surgeon said.

Despite widespread scepticism in the scientific community, Prof Canavero said a brain transplant had "many advantages".

He said: ”First, there is barely any immune reaction, which means the problem of rejection does not exist.

"The brain is, in a manner of speaking, a neutral organ."

He said one problem was the brain would be hosted in an entirely different body, the impact of which remained to be seen.

Nevertheless, Prof Canavero said he hoped to bring back to life the first patients currently frozen at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Arizona.

Should he succeed in resurrecting the dead, Prof Canavero said the implications would permanently alter mankind's understanding of the world - and that religion "will be swept away forever".

He said: "They (religous beliefs) will no longer be necessary, as humans will no longer need to be afraid of death.

"They will know as a scientific fact that our consciousness – or whatever it is – survives death. We no longer need a Catholic Church, no Judaism and no Islam because religions in general will be obsolete."

By extension, the answer to the question "what is the meaning of life?" would also be redundant, the surgeon said.

"If we take hope out of life, out of the human equation, then what remains?," Prof Canavero explained.

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Female sexuality is a trade merchandise. And in feminism, the seller and the merchandise are the same person. Merchandise that sells itself? That can impossibly work out. This is why the patriarchy is the only sensible form of human social organization.

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Camden, New Jersey: How men from Africa and Asia can easily migrate to Europe: Central Mediterranean route

Adam S. Berry 3081 Lee Avenue Camden, NJ 08104

The Central Mediterranean route remained under intense migratory pressure in 2015, although the total number of migrants arriving in Italy fell to 154 000 - about a tenth lower than the record set in 2014. The main reasons for the drop were the shift of Syrians to the Eastern Mediterranean route and a shortage of boats faced by smugglers in the latter part of the year. Smuggling networks remain well established in Libya, where migrants gather before crossing the sea. In 2015 Eritreans, Nigerians and Somalis accounted for the biggest share of the migrants making the dangerous journey.

People smugglers typically put migrants aboard old, unseaworthy fishing boats, or even small rubber dinghies, which are much overloaded and thus prone to capsizing. These vessels are generally equipped with poor engines, lack proper navigation systems and often have insufficient fuel to reach Europe. For these reasons, the vast majority of border control operations in the Central Mediterranean turn into Search and Rescue (SAR) operations.

Trends prior to 2015

The emergence of Libya as a collecting point for African migrants has long antecedents. Until 2010, Libya’s prosperity offered good job opportunities for migrant workers from African countries, who either used it as a final destination, or as a transit country where they could earn money to pay the smugglers for the last leg of their journey to the EU.

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Actually, if they can live with the fact that men have a sexuality to cope with, and if they aren't feminists, women, at least some of them, are quite OK.

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Denver, Colorado: REVEALED: Most popular cosmetic procedures of 2016 and demand for designer vagina

Doris J. Kane 3056 Scheuvront Drive Denver, CO 80211

THE most popular plastic surgery of 2016 has been revealed by surgeons including the rising demand for a designer vagina.

New data released by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) shows there were 17.1million surgical and minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures in the US last year.

Overall surgical cosmetic procedures rose by four per cent when compared to the minimally invasive ones, which grew at the slightly lower rate of three per cent.

1. Of the 1.8million cosmetic surgeries topping the list were breast jobs with 290,467 procedures, up four per cent from 2015.

2. In second place was liposuction, up six per cent from the previous year with 235,247 recorded.

3. A nose job was third, rising two per cent from 2015 with 290,467 surgeries.

4. Next was eyelid surgery with 209,020 people going under the knife, also up two per cent.

5. And lastly facelifts saw a four per cent rise from 2015 with 131,106 recorded jobs.

For the remaining non-surgical treatments, the most popular was botox with seven million procedures recorded, up four per cent.

Second with 2.6m procedures was soft tissue fillers, up two per cent.

Next was a chemical peel, also up two per cent from 2015 with 1.36m performed.

Laser hair removal was fourth with 1.1m, which had dipped one per cent from 2015.

In fifth place was microdermabrasion, which was down 3 per cent with 775,000 procedures.

And for the first time statistics were released for labiaplasty, which has soared in popularity.

Last year 12,000 procedures were carried out, a whopping 39 per cent increase from 2015, when the ASPS began tracking the surgery.

The plastic surgery entails lifting and / or injecting fat or a filler into the area.

ASPS President Debra Johnson, MD, said: “As cosmetic procedures become more common we are seeing more diversity in the areas of the body that patients are choosing to address.

“Now patients have ongoing relationships with their plastic surgeons and feel more comfortable discussing all areas of their body that they may be interested in rejuvenating."

The ASPS also identified new fat trends ranging from body fat reduction to harvesting fat and transporting it to other parts of the body.

Dr Johnson said: "One trend we are seeing with fat involves an increase in fat grafting procedures.

“Plastic surgeons harvest a patient's unwanted fat from their abdomen using liposuction and then inject it to lift and rejuvenate other areas such as the face, buttock and even the breast.

"Because the material injected is the patient's own fat the results typically last longer than fillers."

Statistics show minimally invasive cosmetic fat injections increased by 13 per cent, fat grafting to the buttocks rose 26 per cent, but topping the trend was breast augmentation using fat which rose a whopping 72 per cent.

And non-invasive procedures were also on the rise, including skin tightening and fat reduction.

Injections targeting specific pockets of fat, such as under the chin, rose by 18 per cent.

Fat ‘freeze’ technology increased by five per cent, and skin tightening targeting saggy areas also jumped five per cent.

Dr. Johnson added: "These newer, non-invasive procedures appeal to a broad range of patients.

“Even though they aren't surgeries, patients still need to take these procedures seriously."

The once most popular procedure, the face lift, has enjoyed a resurgence last year after dipping slightly in 2015.

Dr. Johnson said: "Patients are captivated by instant improvements to the face. It's evident in the popularity of apps and filters that change how we can shape and shade our faces.

“I am not surprised to see facelifts back in the top five most popular cosmetic surgical procedures."

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In Uganda, rich fathers use super high dosages of butea superba combined with tongkat ali to turn their gay sons into heterosexual husbands.

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